Blueprint Whistleblowing Prizes

Stephen Sackur interviews Dr Raj Mattu

Raj Mattu


Stephen Sackur interviews John Kiriakou

John Kiriakou


Aaron Kirkhouse accepts award on behalf of Chelsea Manning

Chelsea Manning


The Blueprint Whistleblowing Prizes are a set of prizes awarded to whistleblowers in recognition of their:

  • Bravery
  • Integrity
  • Commitment to the Public Interest
  • Positive and enduring impact
A Blueprint Whistleblowing Prize acknowledges the bravery of the recipient’s decision, in the face of difficult ethical challenges, to reveal the truth. It also recognises their commitment to creating positive change in society.

Special consideration is given to those who have revealed particularly important information in the public interest and who, as a result of their disclosures, have suffered hardship or reprisals.

Ari Danikas (Greece / South Africa)

Ari Danikas was police reserve officer in the Cato Manor unit of the South African police. This unit typically deals with violent crime, including armed robbery, cash in transit robberies, the protection of politicians, kidnapping, drug trafficking, murder investigations and organised criminal gangs. Through the publication of a series of videos and public revelations, Danikas revealed that the unit was allegedly engaged in extrajudicial killing, tampering of crime scenes, and the torture of subjects.

In 2012, working with with South Africa’s Sunday Times journalists Stephan Hofstatter and Mzilikazi wa Afrika (and with some support from a third journalist, Rob Rose), Danikas had his disclosures published.

Višnja Marilović (Bosnia-Herzegovina)

After years of service with the public company Skenderija Centre in her native Bosnia, Marilović blew the whistle on suspected financial irregularities in the Centre.

In 2011, while working as an accountant with the Centre, Marilović reported irregularities in expense reports submitted by the director of the Centre, Saud Dzindo. Dzindo had submitted an invoice for 160 beds (an irregular order for a sports centre). Dzindo had, however, recently purchased a hotel. Suspicious, Marilović confronted her superior. After nothing was done, Marilović contacted her Cantonal Prosecutor’s Office, leading to months of death threats and abuse directed at Marilović, and eventually to her dismissal.

Howard Shaw (UK)

A distinguished and unblemished member of the MET (the UK police), Howard Shaw served for 30 years, with 15 years of his service at the Scotland Yard Fraud Squad. Throughout his career, Shaw received numerous commendations and awards, including from the judiciary. Shaw was the first whistleblower to successfully bring a whistleblowing detriment employment tribunal case against the MET.

In 2008, Shaw blew the whistle about three separate instances of wrongdoing. He disclosed that a work experience intern was appointed to a sensitive area that required stringent security checks. He disclosed that an external consultant was improperly appointed, allegedly due to the consultant’s friendship with a Deputy Assistant Commissioner.

Witness K

Witness K (Australia / Timor Leste)

Witness K is a former senior Australian foreign intelligence officer with ASIS (Australian Secret Intelligence Service). In 2004, Witness K refused to be involved in an ASIS operation to ‘bug’ the cabinet rooms of Timor Leste during negotiations for a proposed oil and gas treaty between Timor Leste and Australia. The deal that was struck as a result of these negotiations is said to be worth an estimated AUD$40 billion.

Timor Leste is one of the poorest countries in this region, and its oil/gas resources are its only source of wealth. The Treaty substantially benefits an Australian company. Witness K determined that the operation’s main purpose was to manipulate those negotiations by providing an unfair advantage to the company.

The names of the Blueprint UK Whistleblowing Prize, the Blueprint International Whistleblowing Prize and the Blueprint Enduring Impact Whistleblowing Prize are the copyright of Blueprint for Free Speech.